denmark-to-wear-special-non-branded-kit-at-2022-world-cup-in-protest-of-qatar

Denmark’s kit manufacturers Hummel say they don’t want to be visible at the Qatar World Cup, publicly voicing their concerns with the host nation’s human rights violations.

In a protest against Qatar, the Danish team will therefore wear ‘toned down’ home and away jerseys with both the crest and the Hummel logo being faded to match the kit itself.

On top of that, Hummel have also released a black and grey third strip, which is meant to symbolise ‘mourning’ for the migrant construction workers who have died.

“We don’t wish to be visible during a tournament that has cost thousands of people their lives,” the company said in a recent Instagram post.

Hummel added: “With the Danish national team’s new jerseys, we wanted to send a dual message. They are not only inspired by Euro 92, paying tribute to Denmark’s greatest football success, but also a protest against Qatar and its human rights record.

Credit: Alamy“That’s why we’ve toned down all the details for Denmark’s new World Cup jerseys, including our logo and iconic chevrons. We don’t wish to be visible during a tournament that has cost thousands of people their lives.

“We support the Danish national team all the way, but that isn’t the same as supporting Qatar as a host nation.

“We believe that sport should bring people together. And when it doesn’t, we want to make a statement.”

Credit: AlamyWhat the sports wear giants are referring to is the shocking death toll reports emerging of migrant labourers who have lost their lives working on Qatar’s stadiums for the World Cup.

To this day, Qatar officials have only reported a couple of incidents.

Qatar’s World Cup organisers, the Supreme Committee for Delivery and Legacy, hit back at Hummel, denying the company’s claims.

“We dispute Hummel’s claim that this tournament has cost thousands of people their lives.

“Furthermore, we wholeheartedly reject the trivialising (of) our genuine commitment to protect the health and safety of the 30,000 workers who built FIFA World Cup stadiums and other tournament projects.”

The statement added: “Like every country, progress on these issues is a journey without a finish line, and Qatar is committed to that journey.

“We urge the DBU to accurately convey the outcome of their extensive communication and work with the Supreme Committee, and to ensure that this is accurately communicated to their partners at Hummel.”

FIFA has strict rules prohibiting any form of political statement on team kits.

But incredibly, Denmark’s new branding actually complies with FIFA’s regulations as it has no direct political symbols or messaging.